Quit Giving Such Lame Gifts – A Guide to Picking the Perfect Present

Gift giving can be a grueling task. I have spent countless hours trying to figure out what to give. What do you give to the person who has everything? How about the person that never likes anything?

After all was said and done, I use to choose lame gifts. Embarrassed by the receiver’s reaction, I typically promised to do better next time. That is until I finally realized that choosing the perfect present did not have to be such a demanding, time-consuming task.

There are three strategies I discovered that can help you pick the perfect present without the headache.

Learn Their Hobbies

Find out if the receiver has any hobbies. Many people collect items such as dolls or airplanes. Golf, chess, music, and reading are also popular hobbies. For these enthusiasts, a new doll for their collection or a new chess set would be the perfect gift.

For instance, I just discovered that a friend collects dolls. To my surprise, she has been collecting them since she was eight and has an extensive doll collection. I immediately made a mental note to buy her a doll for her collection the next time I give her a gift.

Listen For Needs Or Desires

Listen carefully in conversations with the receiver to see if they reveal something they need or desire. Often in conversation people mention an item they need but never got around to buying or an item they want. This item makes the perfect gift.

I purchased the perfect gift for a friend last year using this strategy. In my eyes, he had everything. So in the months leading up to his birthday I listened carefully during conversations with him. One day he mentioned an item that he saw on an infomercial that he wanted. I knew it was the perfect gift for him when he talked about it. He was very pleased when he opened it. The perfect gift!

Determine If There Is A List

Determine if the receiver has made a list of things they need or want. People sometimes make a list to ensure they don’t receive gifts they will not use. We have all received gifts that we either had no use for or just didn’t want. Usually I either re-gift or give the item away. To prevent this from happening, I now keep a running list of things I need and want.

Take Action

Now that I have shared these three strategies with you, it’s time for you to take action. Make a list of people you have to buy a gift for over the next month. As you interact with them make note of any hobbies, needs, or desires. You may even discover that they have a list. Then use what you learn to pick the perfect present.

Choosing the perfect present does not have to be a difficult, time-consuming task that produces lame gifts. Just use the 3 strategies mentioned. You will be glad you did.

So what are you waiting for? Start shopping for the perfect present now!

Negotiating With the Government

I have had the opportunity to negotiate with a number of government agencies for clients, and there is a difference between private industry and administrative agencies and how you should approach them. Research into the “Attorney’s Practice Guide To Negotiations, 2nd Edition” by Donner & Crowe also provides many general considerations when negotiating with the government. In this column, I will share a few thoughts and considerations on the topic to assist you in your next negotiation with a government agency.

Administrators often have an objective that is grounded in public policy rather than in furthering monetary or other less principled goals. While some may say this about every interaction or negotiation, it is especially true that the first step in any negotiation with an administrative agency is to establish a good working relationship. As long as the negotiator acknowledges that social welfare must play a role in the process, it is usually possible for private entities to negotiate with administrative bodies in a friendly, cordial manner, without turning to combative techniques.

When litigating against an administrative agency, it can often be difficult to craft a monetary settlement which will resolve the matter due to the political nature of many administrative agendas. These agendas often have more weight in the matter than mere monetary matters. Additionally, private parties that have long-term stakes in the resolution of the particular case may have a stronger interest in precedent, making it all the more important that their attorneys focus their attack on those aspects of the case which are governed by some aspect of public policy. Therefore, it can be very advantageous to bargain rather than litigate with administrators.

In a short summary of advantages to good faith bargaining versus litigating with administrators by Peter H. Schuck, Yale Law School, as quoted in the Attorney’s Practice Guide To Negotiations, 2nd. Edition,” he includes such reasons as unearthing solutions lying between those extreme positions that will be asserted by the parties in litigation, exposing the true intensity of the preferences rather than exaggerating those intensities, and stimulating the flow of information between the parties rather than constricting interparty communication. Schuck also acknowledges the important advantage that because a bargained solution is essentially voluntary and emerges from a process that helps build consensus, it is likely to generate support by both parties for its implementation. Therefore, a cooperative philosophy, while limited in value in some contexts, is of particular importance in the context of administrative matters.

Sometimes it can be easy to get caught up in the adversarial process and forget how important it is to strive for a friendly, productive relationship with an administrator or regulator. It is basic human nature to be more receptive and trusting to someone you know and remember. It might be a good idea to remember the old cliché, “You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar” the next time you have to deal with a government agency. This saying suggests you can win people to your side more easily by gentle persuasion and flattery than by hostile confrontation, and it can be especially true when dealing with government agencies.

Usually, the first contact with the agency by an attorney is in the form of a letter informing the agency that the attorney has been retained. The letter should be firm and professional, and should indicate a willingness to reach an amicable solution. Harsh or threatening initial contact may cause the agency to develop an overly defensive attitude that may hamper or frustrate future negotiations. Establishing a favorable first impression with the agency and its counsel can go a long ways toward successful bargaining.

Establishing a relationship of mutual trust and respect between the parties creates a greater likelihood that a settlement will be reached. Additionally, any future relationship between the parties will be easier. To assist this process, we should demonstrate our commitment to cooperation from the outset. We must convince the agency, or the agency attorney, that not only are his or her best interests being considered, but those of public interest are as well. There are many ways of effectively appealing to the aesthetic needs of the agency, but one of the most simple is to remember the golden rule and treat those you are dealing with the same as you want to be treated. Respect and consideration go a long way in all negotiations, but especially when dealing with government agents that may often be the recipients of hostile communications over policies they are required to enforce but did not enact. One then must remember to keep their commitment to cooperation throughout the entire negotiation process, even if it ends up being litigated.

While the advice in this column will help most negotiations settle, there are situations when your client’s concerns may not be addressed and it will be necessary to consider the possibility of filing suit. If you exhaust every other means of recourse, and you have been unable to negotiate a satisfactory settlement of obtain a favorable decision from an administrator, a lawsuit may be appropriate. This may also aid your negotiations and is why I stated above that you must keep your commitment to cooperation even during litigation. Filing suit can be useful to encourage administrators to rethink their positions and will also allow for the participation of counsel who may not otherwise have been involved. If you have established a relationship of mutual trust, the lawsuit may be only a stepping stone toward settlement rather than an ugly adversarial quagmire that they can sometimes become. The bottom line is that attorneys must always keep their client’s goals in mind and recognize that negotiations with the government are often different from those with private industry and therefore negotiation strategies and tactics must conform to the situation at hand.

Event Management Course – Learn the Art of Presentation

Delivering presentations to clients and the company board members is a challenge that many of us regularly face as a daily part of our job. Presentation skills are not just limited to typing up speeches on the Power point but also how you communicate your message across to your audience. When you have to manage an event professionally, you have to know how to host a live show or presentation. You have to know how to present the rooms or gardens where you are holding your event. These skills cannot be learnt out of the blue, the usual way to learn these either through the hard way, that is by learning through your mistakes, or the easier way would be to take an Event Management Course which won’t take too much of your time and will benefit you for a life time.

Presentation skills are now considered the most important skills to be equipped with in the twenty-first century, be it a market campaign, a dinner party or just a social get-together; your social skills and your presentation skills matter everywhere. Especially when seeking out new employment, employers first judge the level of presentation skills the person has. These skills also add up as positive points in your personality as it also grooms a person. This helps you in displaying better communication skills, better personal presentation skills and also helps develop much better management skills.

The secret of success behind every presentation is to make sure that you get your point across in a well-defined manner and you make an impression on your targeted group of people.

Opting to go for an event management course you will learn the art of presentation in simple steps.

Keep it simple is the first key to a good presentation. If you are suppose giving a presentation to your boss, keep it to the point, technical vocabulary is important but then make sure that your audience is familiar with the words.

Create a professional image, practice what you have to say in case of a business presentation, and if it is an event presentation make sure that you organize the accessories beforehand, to make sure the entrance, the stage the lighting is perfect and would not need last minute urgent adjustments. Practice makes a man perfect. This is the key rule that is being followed here.

Stay on track. Focus on what you are required to do and fix everything accordingly to the event, for example a stage fit for a wedding will not be appropriate to introduce the Board of Directors at the General Shareholders meeting.

By taking a course in Event Management, you will gain more confidence in tackling situation and of course you will learn the art of presentations of all sorts.